FAQs


Landlords

Why should I use a letting agent?

With low-cost options like OpenRent available, some landlords are tempted to try to let their properties themselves. However, using a letting agent has many advantages over doing it yourself, going beyond simply saving yourself some hassle.

A letting agent is more likely to find you a tenant. We register around 1,500 new applicants every week, and have built up a huge network of potential tenants over our eleven-year history. This database includes several blue-chip companies based in the local area – including GlaxoSmithKline and BskyB – who regularly contact our teams to help them house executives relocating into West London. As a result, we are often able to let our clients’ properties before even advertising them online. When we do market our clients’ properties, our in-house professional photographers produce quality listings which attract large numbers of enquiries from potential tenants.

Using a letting agent also means that viewings at your property are being conducted by professional salespeople, whose negotiation skills ensure that you are likely to achieve the best possible price for your property. In addition, they are also all drawn from the local area, so will be able to sell the benefits of your property’s location to potential tenants.

Once we have sourced you a tenant, our in-house client support team will complete a thorough referencing process to be sure that your tenants are who they say they are, can afford to rent your property, and have a good reference from a previous landlord. The team will also prepare your tenancy agreement to ensure that it includes all of the necessary clauses to protect your property.

In addition, using a letting agent will ensure that you are always compliant with the latest legislation. There are already over a hundred laws to be aware of in the private rental sector, and the legal landscape of the industry is constantly being updated. It is easy for an individual to lose track of this, but as property professionals we are always up to date with current and upcoming legislation, so we will make sure you are always compliant.

Do I need to tell my mortgage lender if I want to let my property? 

If you have a mortgage on the property that you wish to let out, you’ll need to obtain the lender’s permission before you start looking for a tenant. If you fail to do so, you’ll be in breach of the terms of your contract which could lead to your lender calling in the full value of the entire mortgage.

If you have a residential mortgage, you’ll need to obtain “consent to let” from your lender. To get this, you may need to show that your circumstances have changed – for example, if you have to move at short notice for work – or you’ll need to re-mortgage so that you have a buy-to-let mortgage.

For buy-to-let mortgages, your lender may have some conditions about the type of tenant or the length of tenancy permitted at the property, so you should also check these before coming to the market.

How much rent should I charge? 

Rental value is determined by a wide range of factors, depending on the property’s location, size, age and condition, among other things. We would recommend inviting one of our experienced Lettings Managers to your property to provide you with an accurate rental valuation. This figure will take into account other similar properties which we have let and which are currently on the market to ensure that your property is competitive.

When setting a rental price, you should also consider your own priorities. For example, if your main focus is having the property let as soon as possible, you may wish to set a lower rent to attract more potential tenants.

How much will it cost to rent my property? 

Thorgills offers multiple different service packages to suit our clients’ needs, and the cost of renting your property depends on the service you choose.

If you choose our Lettings and Renewals service, we will provide you with an accurate valuation, professional photography and a floor plan, and present your property on portals including Rightmove, Zoopla, OnTheMarket and Primelocation. Our team of qualified locally-based brokers will pitch your property to our extensive database – which includes blue-chip companies as well as families and young professionals – and will provide you with regular feedback. When we receive an offer, our skilled negotiators will ensure you get the best possible price for your property. Our in-house client support team will then complete comprehensive referencing – using open banking if the tenant consents – to progress and execute the tenancy as quickly as possible. During the tenancy our accounts team will collect your rent for you. The cost of this service is calculated at 11% of the total rent we achieve for you, plus vat.

Our Premium Lettings and Renewals service includes all of the above, alongside additional support throughout your tenancy. We will ensure you remain compliant with legislation, and can serve all legal notices to your tenants – including providing support if you need to evict your tenant should they default on your rent. This service also provides you with access to our Experian rental exchange programme, which allows our tenants to build a credit history while renting – encouraging them to pay rent in a timely manner. The cost of this service is calculated at 11% of the total rent we achieve for you, plus vat.

You should also be aware that there are other costs associated with renting out your property besides your agent’s fee. You will need to instruct contractors to produce an Energy Performance Certificate, Gas Safety Certificate, and electrical safety checks, and we would strongly recommend that you have an inventory and check-in completed. You will also need insurance, and may need to pay monthly instalments on your buy-to-let mortgage if you have one.

What is a Tenancy Deposit Scheme? 

A tenancy deposit scheme is a government-backed service which protects deposits paid by tenants renting their homes on assured shorthold tenancies, which are the default tenancy type in England. There are three approved schemes – the Deposit Protection Service, MyDeposits and the Tenancy Deposit Scheme – and it is compulsory for letting agents to register with one. Thorgills is registered with the Deposit Protection Service.

The function of the scheme is to protect the tenant’s deposit for the duration of your tenancy. Thorgills must put the deposit into the Deposit Protection Service’s care within 30 days of receiving it, and it will remain there until the tenancy comes to an end.

At this point, provided that the tenant has met the terms of the tenancy agreement, paid their rent and bills, and haven’t damaged the property, you will need to return their deposit in full within ten days.

However, you are able to make a claim on this deposit if the tenant has broken the terms of the tenancy agreement, failed to pay their rent, or otherwise damaged the property. Should this happen, the tenant can either accept your deductions – in which case you will receive this amount and the tenant will receive the remainder within ten days – or contest them, in which case the Deposit Protection Service’s impartial dispute resolution service will determine the allocation of the deposit.

Should I have an inventory? 

An inventory is not a legal requirement when you let out your property. However, we would strongly recommend that you have an inventory completed before the start of every tenancy, to record the condition of the property and its contents before your new tenants move in, as this is used as the primary source of evidence in any disputes about damages to the property if you wish to make any claims on the tenant’s deposit at the end of the tenancy.

As a landlord, what will I be responsible for? 

As a landlord, your primary responsibility is to provide a property in a habitable condition for your tenants. It must be safe and free from health hazards – your responsibilities in this regard are detailed in a later section.

You’ll also be responsible for a few other things before and during the tenancy.

Before you begin to market your property, you’ll be responsible for seeking approval from your mortgage lender, and then you’ll need to commission an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) for your property if it doesn’t already have one. Details about EPCs can be found in a later section.

Once you have found a tenant but before the tenancy begins, you will need to have provided your tenant with the government’s “how to rent” checklist. If your tenants are paying a security deposit, you will be responsible for registering it with a tenancy deposit scheme as detailed above. If you let your property through a letting agent, they will usually do this for you.

If you agreed to provide anything for the tenant – such as furniture or to repair something within the property – and it is recorded in your tenancy agreement, you’ll also need to have this ready before your tenants move in.

Once your tenants have moved in, you will be responsible for abiding by the terms and conditions laid out in your tenancy agreement. This will include insuring the property, carrying out any major repairs and maintenance, and allowing the tenant “quiet enjoyment” of the property – permitting them to live there without disturbance. You will also be responsible for paying tax on the rental income you’ll be receiving.  

How can you manage my property? 

Having a managing agent is an attractive option for many landlords, as it saves them the time, stress and effort of maintaining their property. These landlords place their property and tenancy in the care of a capable professional, who will ensure that the property is properly looked after and the landlord complies with government legislation.

Thorgills can manage your property for you if you choose either our Property Management or our Premium Property Management services.

If you choose our Property Management service, your property will be assigned to a designated property manager, who will carry out a pre-tenancy inspection before your new tenants move in. They will continue to carry out periodic inspections of the property – starting in the third month of the tenancy – and will provide you with a report of their findings.

In addition, your property manager will oversee any repairs and maintenance which might be required during the tenancy, and will ensure that these are carried out by Thorgills’ approved contractors.

At the end of the tenancy, your property manager will serve the correct legal notices to your tenant, and can advise you on any deductions you may wish to make from the tenant’s deposit. If the tenant disputes your claim, your property manager will also assist you with the adjudication process.

Our Premium Property Management service includes all of the above services, and additionally provides you with a rental guarantee service – which ensures that you will never suffer a loss of income if your tenant defaults for any reason – through our partners at Let Alliance.

What safety requirements must I have in place? 

You will be responsible for providing your tenants with a safe property free from health hazards.

You will need to ensure that the electrical system, and any appliances you are providing, are safe. The government is currently preparing to introduce new Electrical Safety Standards which will require landlords to inspect and test all electrical appliances in their properties once every five years.

If there is any gas supplied to the property, you will also need to instruct a Gas Safe registered engineer to complete an annual gas safety check on every gas appliance and flue within the property.

You will also need to ensure that the property is as safe as possible from fire risks, by providing fire safe furniture, a smoke alarm on every floor and a carbon monoxide alarm in any room with a solid-fuel-burning appliance. If your property is a House in Multiple Occupation, you’ll also need to provide fire extinguishers, and each room will need its own fire alarm.

Do I need insurance? 

It isn’t compulsory for landlords to have landlord insurance, but we would strongly recommend it – and it is unlikely that you will be able to get a buy-to-let mortgage without it.

Most insurers will be able to offer specialist landlord insurance, which offers similar cover to regular home insurance but with additional protection designed for rental properties. There are three types of landlord insurance: buildings insurance (which covers structural damage), liability insurance (which covers accidents within the property) and contents insurance (which covers any fittings and furniture you provide for your tenants).

Thorgills can also provide rental guarantee insurance through our partners at Let Alliance. Landlords who take out this insurance are able to claim if their tenant does not pay their rent in full, meaning that they will always receive the rent to which they are entitled.

What is an EPC and why do I need one?

 

An Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) shows how energy-efficient a property is. A current and potential rating are provided for the property, out of 100, alongside an asset rating between A and G. The EPC will also show a current and potential rating for the property’s impact on the environment, using the same scale and asset ratings.

It is a legal requirement for a property to have an EPC before it is marketed, so that potential tenants are able to factor a property’s energy efficiency – and the impact of this on their utility bills – into their decision of whether or not to rent it. Once you’ve had an EPC completed at your property, it is valid for ten years, so you won’t necessarily need a new one before each tenancy.

Landlords should also be aware that it is now illegal to let out properties with an F- or G-rated EPC. These properties are very energy inefficient and must be improved before they can be rented out.

How do I receive my rental income? 

Your tenants will pay their rent directly to Thorgills in a single payment, either on or before the Rent Due date as stated on their tenancy agreement. This will usually be the same day of the month that the tenancy began.

Our accounts team will confirm that the rent has been paid, and the rent will then be transferred to your account within three working days.

Do I need to pay council tax on the property? 

Council tax is normally the responsibility of the occupant of a property – in other words, your tenant. However, there are some circumstances where the landlord takes responsibility for the payment of the tax. The most common of these is when the property is let out to multiple tenants on separate tenancy agreements. For short lets – of less than six months and two days – the landlord is also responsible for paying council tax.

If a property becomes vacant, the landlord will be responsible for paying council tax.

For further clarification on these circumstances, please contact your local council.

Do I need to pay for the TV license? 

The television licence is the responsibility of the tenant.  

What happens if the tenant damages my property? 

The tenancy agreement states that the tenant is expected to take reasonable care of the property and its contents, which includes keeping it clean, not permitting it to fall into disrepair, and not damaging anything.

As a result, if your tenant – or any guest on the premises – causes damage to your property, the tenant will be liable to pay for this.

At the end of the tenancy, when the tenant’s deposit is due to be returned, you may claim money from this sum in order to pay for the reasonable costs of repairing any damage caused by the tenant. Please note that the tenant is able to contest this figure, in which case you will need to provide evidence of the damage they have caused. It is therefore strongly recommended that you have an inventory produced before the start of every new tenancy, so that you have a record of the condition of your property and its contents before your tenants moved in.

If the tenants used our Nil Deposit scheme, you will be able to claim for damages up to the value of six weeks’ rent – one week’s rent more than a traditional deposit – if you have evidence of the damages caused.

If the cost of the damages caused by the tenant exceeds the value of the deposit – or the maximum amount you can claim from the Nil Deposit scheme – you can take your tenant to court in order to reclaim the full cost of the repairs to your property. Again, an inventory will greatly assist you in proving the scale of damage caused.

What happens if the tenant doesn’t pay their rent?  

In the vast majority of cases, our tenants pay their rent in a timely manner. As part of our partnership with Experian, our tenants can build a credit score by paying rent on time regularly, so they are incentivised to do so, and penalised if they do not.

In the event that your tenant has not paid their rent on the due date, our accounts team will notify you of the delay, and will then contact the tenant to remind them to pay. The accounts team will then continue to contact the tenant until the rent is paid.

If your tenant persistently fails to pay their rent, our team can advise you on how to take steps to regain possession of your property through a Section 8 notice.

If you are concerned about the possibility of not receiving the rent due to you, our team are able to provide you with a rental guarantee service through our partners at Let Alliance.

What is TPO (The Property Ombudsman)? 

The Property Ombudsman is an independent dispute resolution service, approved by the government and several trading standards authorities. Its role is to provide an impartial judgement on complaints made by consumers against property businesses including estate agents, letting agents, and property management companies.

In order to make a complaint with The Property Ombudsman, the consumer must first give the business the opportunity to address and resolve the complaint. If the consumer is unsatisfied with this response, they can take their complaint to The Property Ombudsman who will make a decision based on the evidence, legal principles, their Code of Practice, and what is fair and reasonable in the circumstances.

Tenants 

How do I register with Thorgills for property updates? 

If you are interested in receiving property updates from Thorgills, or you would like to register to rent a property, you can speak to one of our friendly Lettings team on 020 8560 9555 or email us at lettings@thorgills.com. You can also visit us in branch at 44 High Street, Brentford TW8 0BB.

Alternatively, when you’re looking at our properties on our website, on Rightmove, Zoopla or OnTheMarket, you’ll be able to click a button to request more information – this will prompt one of our team to get in contact with you to discuss your requirements.

How do I book a viewing? 

Before arranging a viewing, you’ll need to register with one of our lettings team. They will take your contact information and any relevant information about your search, including your budget, requirements and a profile of you as a potential tenant.

The broker will then be able to book a time slot with you for a viewing. If the property you wish to view is empty, it will normally be possible to view it at short notice, but if someone lives there the broker may need to give them 24 hours’ notice before arranging a viewing.

If it is possible, our brokers will normally show you a selection of similar properties in succession, so that you get the best possible idea of the options available to you. Each viewing will normally take between 15 and 30 minutes, depending on the size of the property.

How do I make an offer?

In order to place an offer on a property, you’ll need to complete our application for tenancy document. This can be done either online or in person with one of our team, and will confirm the details of your offer – the proposed rental amount, the duration of your contract and your move-in date – and some basic information about who will be living at the property. This form will also outline Thorgills’ terms and conditions and the next steps after your offer is accepted, so it is important that you read and understand the document before you sign it.

Once you have signed the application for tenancy document, you will need to pay a holding deposit of one week’s rent before your offer can be presented to the landlord. This deposit will become part of your move-in monies –your deposit and your first month’s rent – once your offer is accepted. If your offer is not accepted, the holding deposit will be returned to you in full.

What is referencing and how does it work? 

Referencing takes place after your offer is accepted, and before you move into your new home. The process is designed to be completed within seven days and consists of a series of checks to confirm your identity and suitability as a tenant. All adults over the age of 18 who will be living at the property will need to be referenced. The process will be completed by our in-house client support team, in partnership with Let Alliance.

We will complete an employment reference, which will confirm your job role and salary matches the details you provided to us upon placing your offer, and that you are able to afford the rent for the duration of the tenancy. To pass this affordability check we require that all of the tenants combined earn at least 2.3x the annual rent of the property.

We will also complete a landlord reference, which will confirm your address matches the details you provided to us upon placing your offer, and if you have a history of renting we will also take a statement from your former landlord(s) to confirm that you will take good care of your new home.

Finally, we will complete a credit check, which will confirm that you do not have any outstanding county court judgements (CCJs) or other legal summons to pay debts or fines.

As an alternative to this format, we also offer a same-day referencing process, which uses open banking to provide a detailed report on your income, expenditure and credit history in real time. This process is comprehensive as well as quick, as it accesses more than just publicly-available information.

What other documentation is required? 

All tenants over the age of 18 who will be moving into the property will need to provide a proof of address. This must be in the form of either a utility bill or a bank statement, dated within the last three months.

We will also need to verify the identity of all tenants over the age of 18 who will be moving into the property. Each individual will need to bring their passport in person to our branch, along with a visa if they are not an EU citizen. If you are not able to attend our branch in person, you can take your identification to the post office or a solicitor, who will be able to provide a certified copy of your passport, which you can then send to us. A full list of professionals who may be able to certify a document can be found here.

What is a guarantor? 

A guarantor is someone who guarantees a tenant’s rent for the duration of the tenancy, in the event that the tenant is unable to pay. Not all tenants require a guarantor – they are usually only required by students or if the tenant fails the affordability criteria of our referencing process as described above, or if they have a poor credit history. We would recommend that your guarantor should be a family member or trusted friend, but anyone can be a guarantor provided they meet the criteria below.

What does a guarantor need to do? 

In order to qualify as a guarantor, you must own a property in the UK. You’ll also need to earn at least three times the annual rent of the property.

Your responsibility as a guarantor is to pay the tenant’s rent if they do not. If a guarantor is required for a property with multiple tenants, each tenant normally has their own guarantor. However, in these instances it is worth noting that you are considered “joint and severally liable” for the rent.

In plain language, this means that you – and all the other guarantors – are responsible for guaranteeing the whole of the rent for the property, and not just the amount owed by the tenant they are acting as a guarantor for.

For example, if you act as a guarantor for a tenant living with two others, all of whom are paying £500 per month, and two of the three tenants fail to pay their rent, all three guarantors are responsible for paying the remaining rent of £1000 – regardless of which tenant has already paid their share. In these situations, the guarantors normally communicate to work out the fairest way of paying the outstanding rent.

How much deposit will I need? 

The amount you’ll need for a deposit will depend on the level of rent you’ll be paying. If your annual rent is less than £50,000 – which equates to a monthly rent of £4166 – your deposit will be the equivalent of five weeks’ rent. If your annual rent is higher than this, your deposit will be the equivalent of six weeks’ rent.

We are also able to offer a Nil Deposit scheme, which would mean that instead of providing a regular deposit you can instead pay the equivalent of a single week’s rent plus vat, followed by a nominal monthly fee for liability insurance. This will cover an insurance policy which protects the property in the same way as a regular deposit. Not all properties are eligible for this scheme so please check with a member of the Thorgills team before proceeding.

You’ll need to decide what type of deposit you’ll be using when you first make an offer on a property.

When will I need to pay my deposit? 

After your offer has been accepted, you will need to pay your move-in monies – your deposit and your first month’s rent – before the tenancy agreement can be signed. The first £1000 of this must be paid within 24 hours of your offer being accepted, and the remaining balance is due within five days.

What is a Tenancy Deposit Scheme? 

A tenancy deposit scheme is a government-backed service which protects deposits paid by tenants renting their homes on assured shorthold tenancies, which are the default tenancy type in England. There are three approved schemes – the Deposit Protection Service, MyDeposits and the Tenancy Deposit Scheme – and it is compulsory for letting agents to register with one. Thorgills is registered with the Deposit Protection Service.

The function of the scheme is to protect your deposit for the duration of your tenancy. Thorgills must put your deposit into the Deposit Protection Service’s care within 30 days of receiving it, and it will remain there until your tenancy comes to an end.

At this point, provided that you have met the terms of your tenancy agreement, paid your rent and bills, and haven’t damaged the property, your landlord will return your deposit in full within ten days. However, your landlord is able to make a claim on this deposit if you have broken the terms of your tenancy agreement, failed to pay your rent, or otherwise damaged the property. Should this happen, you can either accept the landlord’s deductions – in which case you will receive the remaining amount within ten days – or contest them, in which case the Deposit Protection Service’s impartial dispute resolution service will determine the allocation of your deposit.

What is a tenancy agreement? 

A tenancy agreement is a contract between you, the tenant, and your landlord. It legally permits you to live in the landlord’s property, provided you pay the rent and follow the terms and conditions, which will be included in the document.

The tenancy agreement will record a fixed-term length of the contract, the date and amount of rent you will need to pay, and will outline the rights and responsibilities of both you and your landlord for the duration of the tenancy. It will also outline what will happen at the end of the fixed term of the contract.

You will be provided with a hard copy of your tenancy agreement, signed by both you and your landlord, as part of your move-in pack when your tenancy begins.

How quickly can I move in? 

The date on which you will move in forms a part of your offer, so in theory it is up to you! However, you’ll need to wait for the current tenant – if there is one – to move out, and you’ll need to complete the referencing process before you can move in. The broker who showed you the property will be able to take these factors into consideration and advise you on a suitable date.

The date you choose will then appear on your tenancy agreement, which will be signed by both you and your landlord. You will not be able to move in before this date, even if the property is vacant.

What am I responsible for whilst living in a rented property?

 

You will be responsible for paying the rent in a timely manner, either on or before the rent due date. You will also be responsible for the payment of all utility bills, including a television licence if you need one, and the council tax unless otherwise stated.

Your other responsibility is to live in the property in a “tenant-like manner” – in short, this means treating the property like your home. This means that you are responsible for looking after the property and carrying out smaller jobs, such as cleaning, cutting the grass, and changing light bulbs. You’re also responsible for your guests, and making sure that anyone who enters the property treats it with respect – any damage caused by visitors will be the tenant’s responsibility.

You’ll also need to report any more significant maintenance issues – such as leaking pipes or a broken boiler – promptly so that they can be rectified before they get worse and cost your landlord even more money to repair.

You are not expected to perform any “betterment” – which would include major refurbishments, redecoration or other improvements to the property.

Can I decorate the property?

 

You are allowed to bring your own furniture and ornaments into your new home, put up posters or artwork on the walls, and arrange your landlord’s furniture within the property however you think best – provided you do not damage or throw out any of your landlord’s possessions, or damage the property itself.

However, you are not permitted to make material changes to decoration – such as repainting walls or replacing carpets – without the consent of your landlord.

Am I allowed pets? 

There is no law against pets in rental properties, but whether you are allowed one is at the landlord’s discretion. If you have a pet, you should let our team know when you register, and they will be able to give you an idea of which of our clients are more inclined to accept you. If you find a property you like, we would always recommend making an offer. Most landlords would consider accepting a pet at their property provided they receive a good offer – for the rental amount and contract length they were looking for – and if they like your profile as a tenant.

How do I pay the rent? 

Your tenancy agreement will specify the date on which your rent is due – usually this will be the date your tenancy begins, and will be the same date each month. You’ll need to pay your rent in full, in a single payment, either on or before this date every month.

On the date you move in, you’ll be given a move-in pack including a payment information letter, which will contain the bank details you’ll need to pay the rent to and some advice on making sure that your rent is always paid on time.

We will never send out bank details via email, so if you are unsure about where you should be making a payment to please call our branch and speak to someone you know before paying.

If I have any problems, who can I speak with? 

If your property is managed by Thorgills, you will have a designated Property Manager within our team who will be looking after your property. Maintenance issues should be reported to them through www.thorgills.fixflo.com and will then be handled by the relevant Property Manager. Our Property Management team is open from Monday to Friday between 9am and 6pm.

If you need to report an urgent maintenance issue you have had to resolve yourself, please email propertymanagement@thorgills.com to inform them, and then instruct a contractor of your choice to fix the issue. You can then send all documentation to Thorgills for reimbursement, but please note that if a contractor is called out and the problem is not an emergency, you will be liable for the full cost of any contractors’ invoices incurred.

If your property is not managed by Thorgills, you will need to contact your landlord to report any maintenance issues. You will be able to find their contact information in your move-in pack.

If you smell gas or suspect a gas leak, call CADENT on 0800 111 999.

What happens if I damage the property? 

The tenancy agreement states that you are expected to take reasonable care of the property and its contents, which includes keeping it clean, not permitting it to fall into disrepair, and not damaging anything.

As a result, if you – or any of your guests – cause damage to your property, you will be liable to pay for this.

At the end of the tenancy, when your deposit is due to be returned, your landlord may claim money from this sum in order to pay for the reasonable costs of repairing any damage you have caused. You will be able to contest this figure, in which case the Deposit Protection Service will decide the allocation of the deposit.

If the cost of the damages you have caused exceeds the value of your deposit, your landlord may take you to court in order to reclaim the full cost of the repairs to the property.

What happens if I can’t pay my rent? 

Your tenancy agreement will specify the date on which your rent is due – usually this will be the date your tenancy begins, and will be the same date each month. You’ll need to pay your rent in full, in a single payment, either on or before this date every month. If you fail to do so, you will be in breach of your tenancy agreement. In addition, this may affect your credit score, as our partnership with Experian – intended to help you build a positive credit history if you pay your rent on time – will also record if your payments are late.

In the event that you do not pay your rent on the due date, our accounts team will notify your landlord and will then contact you to remind you to pay. They will continue to contact you until the rent is paid.

If you consistently fail to pay your rent on time, your landlord may apply to court to end the tenancy and repossess the property.

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